Yugoslav Communists Did Not Liberate Croatia In 1945! Remembering Bleiburg Genocide

Cardinal Vinko Puljic (bottom centre) leading an online prayer
of Croatians across the world on Saturday 23 May 2020
Photo: Screenshot

“There is method in the madness” idiom originates I believe from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet (1602). Whoever wishes to subscribe to practicing double standards vis-à-vis victims of crimes, in order to justify an oppressive political regime such as communism, is on their own as far as humanity is concerned. Or at least, it should be that way!

There is no spectacular revelation one can make today regarding the radical evil of Yugoslav communist regime (and all other communist regimes particularly in Eastern Europe). That is, since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 what has emerged from the secret archives (and there are still many more to be examined once full access is granted) and other verifiable sources regarding the former communist regimes confirms the long-held view that communists engaged in revolutionary and brutal civil war to accomplish the total transformation of the economy, society, and culture. What is disturbing even more is the comprehensive and systematic justification of communist crimes that defines the method in the madness that is plaguing the world and humanity well into the 21st century. When comparing the number of victims of the communist regimes (between 85 and 100 million worldwide) with the number of people who perished under or because of Nazism (25 million worldwide) then in comparison by numbers of victims one can capture the dimension of horror of communism and its follower’s vicious attempts to avoid due condemnation of communism.

When despite the fact that the European Parliament had late 2019 declared communism, Nazism and fascism as criminal regimes of the past, Croatian politicians and antifascists celebrate even today the 15 May 1945 as the day of liberation of Croatia the world is brought to its knees in despair and misery that lies can inflict upon humanity, upon common sense, upon decency and dignity – upon the truth we seek and strive for.

Let’s get this straight Croatia was not liberated in May 1945 – Yugoslavia was liberated from masses of people who in WWII fought for liberation from oppressive Kingdom of Yugoslavia, led by Serbian Monarchy, so that communism could be installed. Whatever WWII Croatian Independent State (NDH) may have done, whatever crimes may and have been committed in the name of that state the irrefutable fact remains that an overwhelming majority opposing communist forces fought for an independent Croatia and did not indulge in committing crimes against anyone or anything. And for this they were punished, massacred, banished into exile, oppressed … and for this they are being punished and vilified even today!

The communist sympathisers’ protest in Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina) in front of the Catholic cathedral when Cardinal Vinko Puljic held a commemorative mass on 16 May 2020 for the communist Yugoslavia victims at Bleiburg, Austria, in May 1945 and months and years that followed WWII, and the support these protesters rustled up from the World Jewish Congress, Simon Wiesenthal Centre, a number of former communist operatives from former Yugoslavia including its last President Stjepan Mesic attracted worldwide media coverage, which clearly exuded madness that attempts at justification of communist crimes promote. It is in essence pathological madness that is exuded. To discriminate among victims of true crime is a pathological trait that lingers on among human society, making it a truly sick one. The Mass in Sarajevo honoured all innocent victims of the war and post-war era, including all those killed without trial.

The protests or objections to this mass in Sarajevo rested on the rhetoric that hundreds of thousands of Croatian people murdered by Yugoslav communists after WWII ended do not deserve remembrance and respect owed to all victims; that they were murderers of Jews in WWII, of Serbs, of Roma; that they were all Ustashe or fascists…  In New York Times one could read:  “Honoring ‘the genocidal Ustasha state (NDH) is not only an insult to its victims and their families, but also to all those who opposed the crimes committed by the Ustasha,’ the Simon Wiesenthal Center said in a statement on Thursday…” The Times of Israel, Reuters, The Associated Press, Haaretz, Al Jazeera America,  Deutsche Welle etc all promulgated and fired up the protesters’ views and opinions regarding the commemorative mass for victims and barely any promulgated the views and opinions of those who stood behind such a mass; indeed they were labelled as revisionists of WWII fascism and nationalism.

What a sad, sad time for humanity and truth!

If the protesters and their supporters think they scored new points for justification of communist crimes they need to re-examine their conscience, and reality! Nothing was gained from this protest and media frenzy apart from new lies added to the list of methods and tools communist followers use in order to justify the unjustifiable.

About 200,000 soldiers from the WWII Croatian defence forces marched to Bleiburg in May 1945 and about 500,000 civilians (including the elderly, women and children) went with them. They wanted nothing to do with communist Yugoslavia. They all wanted an independent Croatia, away from Yugoslavia.  Isn’t self-determination a right that the world celebrates?

The Sarajevo protesters in front of the Catholic Cathedral on May 16th and their supporters, including the Jewish World Congress and Simon Wiesenthal Centre are saying to the world that all those among the 700,000 Croatians fleeing communist Yugoslavia at the end of WWII – out of which more than 500,000 were murdered by that communist regime post WWII – deserved to be killed so brutally and massively because they all committed crimes against others!

They did not! If among them there were individuals that may have committed crimes during the War that did not and does not justify accusing of crimes without evidence everyone who was there. It is a depravity; it is evil to do so.

Talking to Croatian Catholic Radio, Cardinal Vinko Puljic said that “the Church has always respected innocent victims” and that the mass was not intended to celebrate anyone. He added that a “crime cannot be defended by (another) crime.”

“We want that double standards in respecting the victims of hatred and massacre be stopped,” Cardinal Vinko Puljic said after he held the mass in Sarajevo for victims of communist crimes.

Due to coronavirus restrictions only about 20 people attended the service which, like the protest, ended without incident. It is the world’s media passing on the WWII pro-communist sentiments and crimes’ justification that turned the mass into a spectacle of disorder; a disorder where certain crimes are justified on political grounds, devoid of humanity.

Cardinal Vinko Puljic
Photo: Fena

Sarajevo Times reported on May 17:

“In a sermon during the mass in the Sarajevo Cathedral on Saturday, Vrhbosna Cardinal Vinko Puljic pointed out that the victims of Bleiburg and all victims of hatred cannot be spoken of without ‘special tremors of the heart’ and that this is the main reason why he agreed to lead the Mass on the anniversary of 75 years of suffering in Bleiburg.

Prayer is the most sacred act, an act of respect, remembrance of them, the price of freedom that we build,’ stated Cardinal Puljic and added that this is how the evaluation of living is renewed. Cardinal Puljic said that the fate of peace was largely entrusted, not only to official state institutions. Human justice must prosecute crimes – said the cardinal, but also added that justice stands far from any blind urge for revenge and is guided by the common good.

We owe equal respect to every victim,’ – said the bishops and added that ‘liquidations without a court are always a grave crime before God and people.’

The Archbishop Puljic reminded that he was born in the time of Bleiburg, that all these years, as he said, the graves of the victims were not discovered, that they died without trial, ‘by the arbitrariness of those who boiled without hatred’. That is why yesterday he prayed for the victims of the Bleiburg field of Jasenovac, Glina, Srijemska Mitrovica, Dravograd, Sarajevo, Foca, Siroki Brijeg …

When the silence will rise from these graves depends on today’s authorities,’ said Cardinal Puljic. He added that a climate of coexistence, forgiveness, trust and reconciliation should be created here and today.”

The executions and mass murders known as “Bleiburg massacres/genocide” (although most murders happened away from Bleiburg once the Croats fleeing communist Yugoslavia were forcefully handed back to Yugoslavia by the British forces there) remained a taboo topic until the breakup of communist Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. A large event to commemorate the victims has for many years been held annually in Bleiburg. The Bleiburg commemoration of 2020 had been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic and masses such as the one in Sarajevo were held instead, in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The protesters against the mass in Sarajevo and their supporters viciously attacked the holding of the mass also on grounds of coronavirus related restrictive measures – that it should not be held, that rules of restrictive measures must be adhered to by those who commemorate victims of Bleiburg. However they failed to do the same for the commemoration for the WWII Jasenovac camp victims (Jews, Serbs, Roma, Croats) held only several days before in Croatia!

Alarmingly, the antifascists (or communists in this case, wearing a cloak of false antifascism) do try forcing different rules for different “classes” of victims even though all are in one and the same class: victims!

HE Eric Nelson, the U.S. ambassador to Bosnia, said for the public, Radio Free Europe, on May 15 that commemorations should “focus on remembrance, not revisionism. Especially this year, when we mark the 25th anniversary of the end of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, it is important for everyone to focus on two values of democracy – reconciliation and inter-religious dialogue.”  The U.S. Embassy in Bosnia called “on those organising the Bleiburg commemoration in Bosnia and Herzegovina to refrain from historical revisionism and retrograde rhetoric.” It is a pity and a shame that he even said that – since when is commemoration of victims a revisionism in the sense his words implied! Be that as it may, the facts of history must be revised. We clearly see the need for that when the protesters in Sarajevo and their supporters from the above-mentioned Jewish organisations and also Serbian Orthodox Church actually accuse, abominably, all of the 500,000 and more Croats murdered and executed by the communist regime of Yugoslavia as having been murderers themselves during WWII.

Some might call such commemoration as the one in Sarajevo an “opening of old wounds” but it’s blatantly evident that those who call it that with a view of criticising it have a great deal of guilt to hide. It is obvious for the sake of peace, for the sake of truth, that factual revision of WWII history of Croatia (written by the communists and their sidekicks) is no longer a choice. It is a must! Ina Vukic

 

Croatia: No Victim Of Communist Crimes Mourns Death Of Josip Broz Tito

Thirty-nine years ago on 4th May 1980 I sat with friends watching a matinée movie at a theatre in the centre of Zagreb, Croatia, and suddenly the movie stopped screening, lights came on and a man, his face an embodiment of doom, gloom and despondency, appeared on the stage announcing Josip Broz Tito’s death. The Yugoslav dictator, the communist criminal had died – I sighed with relief, making sure nobody noticed my relief. I joined the rest of the moviegoers exiting the theatre with their heads bowed – dazed and bewildering silence was deafening! Got out into the streets to face people walking along the footpaths silently, heads down, lost – overcast of doom and gloom as if the promise of life had just been sucked out from underneath their feet … Unsure what to expect, people went straight home, waiting for further news or, better said, how to express grief one was expected to feel even though multitudes could dance from joy if only there was freedom to express that joy. Theatres, streets and restaurants were deserted in no time. The air was uncomfortably heavy with one question: Now what? What do we do now?

The overwhelming majority of the population of Yugoslavia at that time did not know it, but the answer to “ now what?” had been prepared well in advance – Tito’s death has changed nothing for you; you continue as you were conditioned to adore Tito and what he was! Ahead of Tito’s death the communist regime had prepared special editions of newspapers that were simply sent to press, in order to reach newsstands the same evening. Communist controlled television and radio programmes had also been made in advance – ready to go on air.

The police and the army were put on the highest alert.

That media content was engineered to serve the regime’s needs is unsurprising, considering that Yugoslavia was an oppressive dictatorship and autocracy. But the quick mobilisation of the army shows just how bad an autocracy it was. The mobilisation of its army was not to fend off any would-be external enemy but to ensure its people, whom the system feared, was kept in check.

A couple of days later Tito’s coffin, on its way to the burial place in Belgrade, arrived at the central railway station in Zagreb and brought out into the vast city square in front of the station. The army and the police (in either uniform or civilian attire) took up strategic positions, ensuring order. All workers from all employers (communist government owned and run, of course) in Zagreb were ordered and commanded to go to that square, stand in a designated spot and “mourn” and “wail”. Photographs of millions mourning Tito’s passing that circled the world were the result of multitudes being forced to go to the event, no one dared not to go. The staged “goodbye to Tito” event, in particular, the realisation of how shockingly successful the communist regime under Tito was in brainwashing its people, creating servants of them like no other oppressive government apparatus I had come across, had sunk into me like a heavy load impossible to bear.

This country under Tito’s regime had managed to brainwash quite a number of its people into behaving as if the brutal and genocidal communist crimes ( led by Tito himself) during and after WWII were a necessity and a “human right” within the realm of communist regime survival. Within a couple of months my bags were packed, to leave. It would take a generation or two to cleanse the nation of communist mentality, I was certain of that and certain that such cleansing would be ugly.

Josip Broz Tito manipulated the Leninist doctrine to suit his needs and boost his popularity – all in pursuit of power. He used the Communist secret police UDBa to take command of Yugoslavia in Belgrade after the Second World War, and quickly subjected the country to a one-party system under the control of one man – himself. When he realised that Moscow wanted to curb his power, Tito broke off ties with Stalin (1948) and started flirting with the West. Once his new friends started pushing for fair elections and a multi-party system, he turned his back on them, too …

From early 1960s Tito decided to open the borders to Yugoslavia’s unemployed – so that they could go and work abroad. A huge wave of people left, hoping for jobs that did not have Communist party membership as the main prerequisite. But free travel was not for everybody – many political opponents and dissidents were banned from leaving the country, just as they were banned from working in it. In fear of reprisal and brutalities against them multitudes of anti-communist Croatians fled Yugoslavia before the opening of the borders, risking their own lives in that process.

Whoever Tito saw as an obstacle to his ultimate control was removed – killed, or arrested and sent to labour camp. One of the most notorious ‘penitentiaries’ for political prisoners was Goli Otok (Naked Island), which operated in a similar way to Stalin’s death camps. During Tito’s 37 years of rule, tens of thousands were detained and punished for speaking out against the regime, or even for expressing divergent views… hundreds of thousands of innocent Croatians murdered, dumped into mass graves either while still alive or dead.

Saturday 4 May 2019 saw a number of chilling events in Croatia remembering with seeming respect and devotion Tito’s death, by displaying the symbols of communist Yugoslavia, photos of Tito – by spreading further lies and deceit about how great Tito was. The hundreds of mass graves of victims of communist crimes strewn across Croatia – remain without justice. The events that marked remembrance of communist crimes victims did not make it into the Croatian mainstream media.

Nothing much has changed there; communist sympathisers and followers still control the mainstream media. The leaders of Croatia’s antifascist movement, such as former presidents of Croatia like Stjepan Mesic and Ivo Josipovic, repeatedly identify themselves with Tito. They offer no apologies for Tito’s methods and the Communist Party’s crimes. Ivo Josipovic had the gall last week to try and convince the Croatian public that the scores innocent Croatian monks murdered in February 1945 by Tito’s communists during WWII in Siroki Brijeg, Bosnia and Herzegovina, were a legitimate military target – because they were anti-communist!

Be aware, antifascism is not a catchall category of democrats as Croatian antifascists, and many throughout the world, paint it. It is a communist construct. It is, indeed, meaningless without reference to communist ideology. Its exponents quickly manifest this even today by their willing defence of the record of Communism, their espousal of a recognisable (anti-Western) Communist world view, and their unshakeable conviction that the only threat to civilisation comes from the Right, not the Left.

Tito, in fact, behaved as Communists do, promoting revolution by the mass liquidation of potential opponents, by subverting every independent institution, and by bringing all power within the Party’s control. He authorised the killing of hundreds of thousands of people without trial, some with staged trials — soldiers, conscripted Home Guard members, unpolitical civilians, Catholic priests, monks and nuns, doctors, nurses, teachers, journalists, businessmen, women and children. The mass graves, where people were thrown in alive to be slowly suffocated by the weight of those who followed, are still gradually being excavated and the mainstream media instead of keeping this fact in public view constantly choose to pay it a lip service and bury it as quickly as the victims in those mass graves perished. For fear of annoying influential Communist cadres, who had joined anti-Communists to create the fledgling Croatian state in 1991, these horrible crimes were for many years left unmentioned. Until recently, most Party and secret police archives were similarly inaccessible. There has been no lustration of Party members and functionaries. Not a single trial within Croatia has been held of a Communist official: only in Munich, after Germany managed to secure their extradition, were two high-ranking Yugoslav secret police officials (Josip Perkovic and Zdravko Mustac) given life sentences (2018) for a politically authorised murder on German soil in 1983.

Tito’s communist murder squads operated across Yugoslavia, across Croatia, across the world. Surely, his death cannot be mourned or remembered by anything other except disdain and contempt for Tito and what he stood for! The only thing that can be mourned in Croatia is the fact that no person, no persons who engaged in that murderous purge of anti-communist Croatian people have been brought to justice, no condemnation of the communist regime has been achieved so to stamp, once and for all, Croatia’s past under the communist regime with facts that show unreservedly that Tito’s communist Yugoslavia was a frightening bundle of crimes and genocide against humanity. Ina Vukic

Communist Crimes: Tito’s Murder Squads Targeted All Croats Who Opposed His Regime

Defendants Josip Perkovic , left,  and Zdravko Mustac, second right,  former members of the Yugoslav secret service,  arrive for their trial in a Munich courtroom  Friday Oct. 17, 2014. A former head of Yugoslavia’s  secret service and a one-time subordinate  have gone on trial in Germany  over the 1983 killing of a Croatian national in Bavaria.  Zdravko Mustac and former subordinate Josip Perkovic,  who later created independent Croatia’s spy agency,  are both charged with being accessories  to the murder of Stjepan Djurekovic.  The dissident was shot and beaten on July 28, 1983  in a garage in Wolfratshausen, near Munich.  (AP Photo//Michaela Rehle,Pool)

Defendants Josip Perkovic , left,
and Zdravko Mustac, second right,
former members of the Yugoslav secret service,
arrive for their trial in a Munich courtroom
Friday Oct. 17, 2014. A former head of Yugoslavia’s
secret service and a one-time subordinate
have gone on trial in Germany
over the 1983 killing of a Croatian national in Bavaria.
Zdravko Mustac and former subordinate Josip Perkovic,
who later created independent Croatia’s spy agency,
are both charged with being accessories
to the murder of Stjepan Djurekovic.
The dissident was shot and beaten on July 28, 1983
in a garage in Wolfratshausen, near Munich.
(AP Photo//Michaela Rehle,Pool)

 

How much the “West” will have to answer for – or at least express profound regret – as its complicity in Communist crimes is gradually revealed, may be something that will come to light in no other place but Germany. The past couple of decades have been marked with trickles of information, which suggested that the “West” was complicit in murders of Croatian nationals, who had sought refuge from Yugoslav Communist terror abroad. The complicity in this case would be defined by the “West’s” pandering to Communist Yugoslavia and its leader Josip Broz Tito, who served as a kind of a buffer zone between East and West during the Cold War of the last century. In this “pandering” and “wooing” of the cold-blooded murderer Tito by the “West” meant that Tito’s secret police could operate undisturbed and at times even with the assistance of police and secret services throughout that “West”.

The case of the “Croatian Six” in Australia, for example, has seen ample arrows pointing to the likelihood of police services assisting the Yugoslav secret police agents in their murderous, dirty work of persecuting and framing for terrorism freedom loving Croats in Australia.

There are ample cases of similar human darkness in aid of political maps across the Globe.
The former head of Yugoslavia’s secret service, Zdravko Mustac, and a one-time subordinate, Josip Perkovic – who later created independent Croatia’s spy agency, have gone on trial in Germany, on Friday 17 October 2014, over the 1983 killing of a Croatian dissident in Bavaria, Stjepan Djurekovic. They are both charged with being accessories to the murder. Djurekovic was shot and beaten on July 28, 1983, in a garage in Wolfratshausen, near Munich.
Both, Perkovic and Mustac, refused to testify on the charges against them as their trial opened and the Prosecutors allege that Mustac ordered Perkovic to plan and prepare Djurekovic’s killing.
Croatia, under its pro-communist government led by Zoran Milanovic and president Ivo Josipovic, initially refused to extradite Perkovic but bowed to German pressure, and pressure from Brussels, and sent him to Germany in January 2014. It extradited Mustac in April 2014.

The numerous murders of Croats in Germany by the communist Yugoslavia secret police, says Deutsche Welle are among the longest unsolved murders in Germany: Up until the fall of the Berlin Wall, around 30 opponents of the Yugoslav regime were killed in the Federal Republic. Most of them were exiled Croats. The assassination orders came from Belgrade. For years, German investigators searched for the murderers and the people behind them. One of the masterminds was Josip Perkovic. German prosecutors believe the former high-level intelligence agent was responsible for the murder of Stjepan Djurekovic over 30 years ago. Now Perkovic has been indicted in Munich. Philipp Grüll and Frank Hofmann have been looking into this and many other cases. The result is a documentary as exciting as a thriller by John le Carré”.

 

The above documentary film released is titled “Tito’s Murder Squads” and absolutely eyes-opening, especially in aid of revealing how easy it was for Tito to gobble-up oceans of funds or loans from the West to maintain his Yugoslavia and to maintain the false economy whose main role was to glorify communism in the eyes of the ordinary people; the false sense of prosperity under communism, brainwashing millions and murdering more than a million of innocent people in the process. All Tito needed to do is to split from Joseph Stalin (Russia), which he did – starting in 1948 and finishing in 1955, and “milk and honey” flowed like a wild river from the West into his Yugoslavia while he hatched-up and set into motion secret plans to murder every Croat (or other national within Yugoslavia) who opposed his communist regime.

Tito was marked by resistance to the Nazis and he was traumatised by the fact that the Croats had set up their own nation state with the help of the Nazis, and then fought against him. He never forgot that and for him the war continued. Now, against opponents in exile, like the Croats,” says the documentary film.

The founder of Yugoslavia, Josip Broz Tito, made no distinction between the fascists and democratic opponents. Tito’s Yugoslavia fought them all equally bitterly. They were all to be exterminated! After all, Tito was Stalin’s pupil and protégé regardless of the fact that he broke away from Stalin’s Russia. The “West” did, it seems, believe in Tito and his integrity when it comes to breaking away from Stalin but the truth is that the close bond between Yugoslav and Russian communists never entirely broke off; even today’s close relations of Serbia (Belgrade) with Russia are a testament to that fact, and these relations were cemented during Tito’s time in Belgrade, the capital city of former Yugoslavia.

The Yugoslav secret service went to any length to combat their communist regime’s opponents.

“At the time, our main interest was to find a way to diffuse tensions in Europe and to calm down relations with the Soviet Union,” says Klaus von Dahnanyi (SPD) Former German Deputy Foreign Minister (Close confidant of Willy Brandt, Chancellor of Germany 1969 – 1974) in the documentary film.

It was the Cold War era in Europe and East and West stood facing each other – weapons loaded. Germany’s Social Democrats were trying to find a way out of the confrontation; their new foreign politics also needed Tito’s help. Willy Brandt openly courted Yugoslav support.
The issue of permeating The Wall was an overriding one, especially as far as Yugoslav was concerned, but also Romania too.

Tito’s Yugoslavia was caught between East and West, West Germany rolled out the red carpet in its then capital Bonn. Willy Brandt and the communist leader Tito – the two men’s friendship laid the foundation for a new political concept: to tie Yugoslavia to the West.

Germany supported the communist regime of Yugoslavia with loans. In the early 1970’s hundreds of millions of Deutschmark flowed from Bonn to Belgrade.

Meanwhile, the Yugoslav regime drew up a secret State directive for a special kind of war: the secret service was given the power to fight opponents of the state abroad – signed Josip Broz Tito.”

And so, the “West” left the door ajar for Tito’s Yugoslavia to “slip in” and build an enormous network of spies on its own soil. Croats who had fled or left communist Yugoslavia were spied on, shadowed, marked as enemies of Yugoslav state – the state that “West” decided was its “new-found” friend. Yugoslav Consulates and Embassies across the “West” became centres for the communist spy rings. Instructions to label all Croats terrorists and fascists, instructions to murder freedom from communism activists, instructions to frame Croats as terrorists, instructions to murder the leaders of communist opposition abroad came from Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital, as well as from other parts of Yugoslavia. The Yugoslav secret service drew up death lists and meticulously planned dozens of murders of Croatian nationals across the Globe.

Soon after the re-unification of Germany its then Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel (who was West Germany’s minister of justice when the nation was unified) said this at a session of parliament in September 1991when speaking of communist crimes in East Germany: “We must punish the perpetrators. This is not a matter of a victor’s justice. We owe it to the ideal of justice and to the victims. All of those who ordered injustices and those who executed the orders must be punished; the top men of the SED (Socialist Unity Party of East Germany) as well as the ones who shot [people] at the wall.”

Aware that the feelings against communists were running high among their victims, Kinkel pointed to past revolutions after which the representatives of the old system were collectively liquidated. In the same speech before parliament, he said:

Such methods are alien to a state ruled by law. Violence and vengeance are incompatible with the law in any case. At the same time, we cannot tolerate that the problems are swept under the rug as a way of dealing with a horrible past, because the results will later be disastrous for society. We Germans know from our own experience where this leads. Jewish philosophy formulates it in this way: ‘The secret of redemption is called remembering.’”

Months will pass before Perkovic and Mustac murder trials are over in Germany. Whether they are found guilty or innocent of the particular murder they are on trial for does not matter in the big scheme of things to do with communist crimes. What matters most is that this trial represents a dawn of a new future – the future that will not tolerate communist crimes cover-ups and the future, which will undoubtedly make use of the facts uncovered during this trial. For Croatia it will also mean that its political elite of former communists and antifascists will need to walk the streets lowering their head in shame. Tito’s Communist Yugoslavia secret police UDBA was worse than the WWII Hitler’s Gestapo when one only looks at the oppression and fear it spread, let alone the liquidations of its regime’s opponents that remain in part as unsolved murders but in their multitudes as skeletons buried in many hundreds of mass graves and dark underground pits across Croatia and the former Yugoslavia. Ina Vukic, Prof. (Zgb); B.A., M.A.Ps. (Syd)

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