Croatian Operation Storm – A Moral And Military Victory By An Exceptional People

General Slobodan Praljak
“played an enormous role in the protection of Jews. It is a historical truth that needs to be repeated thousands of times” (Jakov Bienenfeld, Bet Israel of Croatia)
Photo: Screenshot

Operation Storm – a new documentary film by Nikola Knez. In English.

Operation Storm was the single-most decisive battle of the Croatian War for Independence. Launched by the Republic of Croatia in August 1995, it was the largest European land battle since the Second World War. The success of this remarkable military action by Croatia came after four years of brutal fighting. Outnumbered, outgunned, but not outmaneuvered, this tiny new democracy prevailed in a David versus Goliath battle, a moral as well as military victory by an exceptional people. Storm ended the massive humanitarian disaster and genocide committed by the Serbian Army and Chetnik terrorists. It led to the liberation of one third of Croatian territory seized by the enemy, and it made possible the Dayton Agreement that brought peace to the region. This film documents the events surrounding this extraordinary battle, demonstrating that Croatia, along with its army and generals, deserve commendation from the world community, if not a Nobel Peace Prize.

 

 

(Operacija Oluja – novi dokumentarni film Nikole Kneza

Operacija Oluja bila je najodlučnija bitka hrvatskog rata za neovisnost. Pokrenuta od strane Republike Hrvatske u kolovozu 1995., bila je to najveća europska kopnena bitka od Drugog svjetskog rata. Uspjeh ove izuzetne vojne akcije Hrvatska postigao je nakon četiri godine brutalnih borbi. Ova malena nova demokracija brojčano nadmašena, oružano nadmašena, ali ne i izmanevrirana, prevladala je u borbi Davida protiv Golijata, u moralnoj i vojnoj pobjedi izuzetnog naroda. Oluja je okončala masovnu humanitarnu katastrofu i genocid koji su počinile srpska vojska i četnički teroristi. To je dovelo do oslobađanja jedne trećine hrvatskog teritorija koje je neprijatelj zauzeo, i omogućila je Daytonski sporazum koji je donio mir regiji. Ovaj film dokumentira događaje oko ove izvanredne bitke, pokazujući da Hrvatska, zajedno sa svojom vojskom i generalima, zaslužuje pohvalu svjetske zajednice, ako ne i Nobelove nagrade za mir.)

Croatia: The Haunting Of War Missing 25 Years On

Connor Vlakancic at Vukovar November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Connor Vlakancic
at Vukovar
November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

 

Being in Vukovar on the 25th anniversary of horrid atrocities committed against innocent Croatian people by the Serb aggressor was a sombre, sad, gut-wrenching experience for over 120,000 people who visited there on 18 November and vividly remembered the horrors once again as my last post read. For those who were unable to be there, here is a close-up journal of what Connor Vlakancic’s eyes saw in the day leading up to that big day, on the day of Remembrance itself and the day after; what he felt as any of us might in the same place; he came from the US to be there.

Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Photo: Connor Vlakancic

It is now 03:01, I can’t slumber, I must search about. The sky black of overcast and haze at ground level in the streetlights. The temperature is brisk and a breeze is up. An autumn morning that would have 99% of families asleep so to wake-up for a typical workday. But on this day 25 years ago, nobody blissfully slumbered in Vukovar and so it is every year on this date. And I have been here many times.

Photo; Connor Vlakancic

Photo; Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar is dear to me, I was married here in the Church of Philip and James (Svetog Filipa i Jakova) in September 2001, also the first year of the Vukovar Remembrance.

The holes dug into the bottom of all the stone and mortar columns, which the retreating JNA army (Yugoslav Army) would fill with explosives intending to even obliterate survivors’ memories (a hero had prevented their detonation) were all visible with a single candle in each.

Reminders of war dot the streets of Vukovar 18 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Reminders of war dot the streets of Vukovar
18 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

On this date the church was long yet to be finished renovated, wounds in the walls and marble floors painfully still obvious, yet the bell in the reconstructed tower [the first work accomplished] was rung for 24 hours.

 

Vukovar hospital basement - preserved Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar hospital
basement – preserved
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

At 06:00, shortly after daybreak, the buses start arriving at the bus station (autobusni kolovador) the passengers walking to the hospital where the Remembrance Walk will start the five-kilometer march to the Vukovar Memorial Cemetery. As has been every year starting 2001. Me too.

South Courtyard Vukovar Hospital monument to the fallen Photo: Connor Vlakancic

South Courtyard
Vukovar Hospital
monument to the fallen
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

 

Vukovar hospital basement remembering those that perished November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar hospital basement
remembering those that perished
November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

I stand waiting in the hospital South side courtyard. I am up several steps of an alternate side building, watching, and my camera busy, overlooking the area as it fills with people. Veterans of every city, town and village, each it seems with their own municipality regimental flag, such a number of them 1,000+ I can believe.

a Proud flag in Vukovar Hospital courtyard Photo: Connor Vlakancic

a Proud flag
in Vukovar Hospital courtyard
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Following the dedication ceremony commencement and memorial song, the Remembrance Walk commenced shortly after 10:20. With flags flying unfurled, it took 45 minutes for the leading line to reach the cemetery, yet people were even then still just departing from the hospital and so it was for nearly two hours more and another hour for the march to finish for all walking. The time is now 14:00 and memorial flowers and wreaths are placed at the central statuary. I can’t get near. I must return tomorrow to see this up close.

 

Ceremony begins at South courtyard Vukovar Hospital 18 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Ceremony begins at South courtyard
Vukovar Hospital
18 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

 

Procession starts at Vukovar Hospital to Memorial Cemetary 18 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Procession starts at Vukovar Hospital
and continues to Memorial Cemetary
18 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

 

This day commences familiar renewed for me, upon walking back toward ‘center’. Along the return route, again I stand and look up at the Vukovar water tower that stands on a ridge overlooking the Danube River. Built in 1968, it held 2200 cubic meters of water and had a restaurant at the top. It survived an estimated 600 direct hits from JNA bombardment. Many are the pictures of its suffering. I walk to encircle the water tower. There is no fear of walking around and under it. Years ago it was encircled with scaffolding (150 feet tall), all loose bricks were removed and all remaining were made secure. Now, these 25 years past, there are ongoing plans (the financial means accumulated) to renovate it into a new life.

Vukovar water tower 18 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar water tower
18 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Walking to an adjacent neighborhood, I visit my fondest dearest friends in Vukovar, Vilma and Ruzica. These two heartfelt people embody and mentor all that is Vukovar. Vilma, indispensable to the life flow of Vukovar, has again prepared her specialty, sarma (cabbage roll), enough to feed the Croatian army. Many people come, it is built into our remember. Ruzica is the curator of the baroque Eltz Palace that contains the Vukovar museum.

 

Remember Vukovar Renovated Eltz Palace Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Remember Vukovar
Renovated Eltz Palace
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

 

 

Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Photo: Connor Vlakancic

 

 

Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Soon enough, it is 18:00+ and pitch black. I go with Vilma and Ruza to see what I have not previously witnessed, one thousand candles, each on a tiny boat, one each for all persons missing, not accounted for, disappeared, ‘gone missing’. The Danube flows past Vukovar, a river of history and mystery. A thousand candles for the unforgotten because we remember for them.

Vukovar 18 November 2016 Floating Candles on Danube Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar 18 November 2016
Floating Candles on Danube
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

One candle each for the thousand persons who are unaccounted for, yet here again, we remember for them. Deposited upstream from three boats, the thousand candles drift downstream longer than a kilometer. My camera cannot adequately capture their breath. The moon, since last extraordinary display event ‘super moon’ in 1948, is in bright display. Yet, its light fails to illuminate this solemn Remembrance. Many people watch, nobody speaks, and a young mother nurses her baby. Tomorrow more will be revealed.

Vukovar 19 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar 19 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Now Saturday (19 November) morning at 07:00, sleeping a bit longer from physical and emotional exhaustion, I return to Center. The open market has returned to normal typical activity, and much surprise to me too…

I drive past a long tented area. Yesterday it encompassed a great many tables with adjacent food preparation. Feeding 100,000+ people requires such and many more. This morning, even so early, the tables are gone but with human waste of empty cups and paper plates littering the ground.

Vukovar Memorial Cemetery 19 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar Memorial Cemetery
19 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Onward I drive, returning to the Vukovar Memorial Cemetery to capture 25 years plus one day in pictures. The pavilion (that yesterday you could not get close to as Mass was being celebrated) stands empty with the canvas cover [roof] now lowered to disassemble position. There are a few, actually several, people coming and going that perhaps could not come yesterday because they were service staff working to feed the 100,000+ people that returned to Vukovar Remembrance.

Vukovar 18 November 2016 Reminders of terrible war still haunt Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar
18 November 2016
Reminders of terrible war still haunt
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Now about 10:00 in the morning, the cemetery area has been picked-up of human trash, collected in black plastic bags to be disposed of, perhaps in earthen burial pits. Twenty five years ago black plastic body bags were not required for disposing of ‘human litter’!

The day after twenty-five years ago, human litter was human beings. Of the perpetrators, certainly for some of them, I am prayerfully for some of them, the enormity of the deprivation of human life wrought while they were drunk and disorderly, invaded their mind with revulsion for what they participated in and thus captured as the chronicle of their lives.

November 19th, 1991 [be there in your mind] and Remember all of Vukovar murdered heroes. They don’t remember, we must Remember for them.

Holy Mass at Vukovar Memorial Cemetery 18 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Holy Mass at Vukovar
Memorial Cemetery
18 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

I returned to the memorial cemetery at dusk. The votive candles, individually lit one-by-one each deposited by an individual person that Remember. By now the temperature has fallen to about 13 degrees with a slight breeze. Yet, as I stand downwind of certainly thousands of candles, the air temperature is 22+ degrees, a LOT of candles. I reflect as this is the warmth of the spirits of the dear departed giving their gratitude to we who come to Remember the chronicle of innocent victim lives.

Vukovar Cemetery 19 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Vukovar Cemetery
19 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Grave-sites of those who were ‘eliminated’ between August and December 1991 are adorned with every flower and candle that our Remembrance can enshrine. Here too, the thousand of lost ‘gone missing’ are remembered in an array of 36 by 28 stone crosses. Each Remembered with flowers and votive candles but where are they, dumped in mass graves … somewhere … nearby.

So, that is the point of this Vukovar Remembrance of 25 years ago, the missing are still missing! With 25 years of Remembering, the 25 years of Croatian governments have failed to achieve, even failed to try to achieve, secretly know grave-sites in villages around Vukovar.

For the families of the victims of the JNA executioners, where are the missing buried. This question is foremost what these families remember for all these 25 years!,” Connor Vlakancic

Lest We Forget! Vukovar Memorial Cemetery 18 November 2016 Photo: Connor Vlakancic

Lest We Forget!
Vukovar Memorial Cemetery
18 November 2016
Photo: Connor Vlakancic

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