Croatia: Freedom Festival, Media Censorship and Covid-19

Stipo Milnaris, MP (L), Karolina Vidovic Kristo, MP (C)
Zlatko Hasanbegovic, MP (R)
Freedom Festival Zagreb 5 September 2020
Banner: “Free Media is Our Media”
Photo: Screenshot

 

When there is utter censorship of professional and other opinion within the mainstream media, such as in Croatia, then the only way to nationally express a different opinion to the one imposed by the mainstream media is for people to take to the streets and city squares.

Saturday, 5th September 2020 on Ban Jelacic Square in Zagreb, Croatia, saw an event unfold – Freedom Festival.  Several thousand people filled the capital city’s main square, several bus loads arriving from other cities such as Split, Dubrovnik, Zadar, Sibenik and Rijeka.

Organised by the “Rights and Freedom” initiative, the aim of the festival was to advocate for the preservation of the achievements of a democratic society in which decision-making based on panic and propaganda or rewriting instead of re-examination cannot be tolerated. The festival aimed at insistence on the preservation of human rights, freedoms, knowledge, solidarity and mutual respect. “We want to emphasise that our health is a phenomenon on the psychological, physical and mental, and not just on the coronary level,” said a statement on an invitation to the festival flyer.

Freedom Festival Zagreb Croatia
5th September 2020
Banner: “Common sense is our sense”
Photo: Screenshot

In addition to the tourist bus and music, those gathered carried banners with messages such as “Take off your mask, turn off the TV, live life to the fullest”, “Covid is a lie, we are not all covidiots”, “Parents and children are inseparable”, “Better grave than slave”. “Free life is our power,” “Normal and point,” “Resistance against the System”, “Free Media is Our Media” and “We believe in the power we have.” None of those gathered at the festival, which some call a protest, wore a mask.

Freedom Festival Zagreb Croatia
5 September 2020
Banner: “Resistance against the System”
Photo: Boris Kovacev/Cropix

Members of the Croatian Parliament from the Miroslav Skoro Homeland Movement (Domovinski pokret Miroslava Škore) supported the Freedom Festival, mingling with the crowds. They were Stipo Mlinaric and Karolina Vidovic Kristo and Zlatko Hasanbegovic (Block for Croatia)

“What is happening today is the culmination of the denial of human freedoms and rights through some of the measures imposed by the National Civil Protection Headquarters. Current data both in Croatia and in the world indicate that the mortality rate in previous years is comparable to the mortality rate in 2020, the year when the coronavirus appeared.

Yesterday, Dr. Srecko Sladoljev said that the virus is spreading through the population, but that no stronger symptoms develop, so I don’t know if we can talk about a disease caused by a coronavirus infection when the danger of corona fits the risk of colds or flu.

And if so, then we as a civilization are faced with the question of whether we will deny human rights, freedom of movement, expression, media freedom … because someone decided that the danger of coronavirus is terrible, and in fact mortality in the general population in 2020 is comparable to previous years. Many MPs from various clubs in Parliament demanded the removal of Krunoslav Capak and the abolition of the Headquarters.

I am looking for something concrete that can be done immediately, and that is to let experts of different views speak publicly and equally, for example, famous scientists like Srecko Sladoljev, Valerij Vrcek or Dr. Lidija Gajski get media space equal to that of the Headquarter’s Krunoslav Capak, Vili Beros and Alemka Markotic,” said Karolina Vidovic Kristo, MP.

Freedom Festival Zagreb Croatia
5 September 2020
dr Srecko Sladoljev speaks at the event
Photo: Screenshot

That which Karolina Vidovic Kristo, MP, said to journalists at the event was the real point of this Festival and not some Covid-19 denying hordes making noises as some mainstream media try to portray this event. Yes, Covid-19 pandemic was the topic but not to deny it. Rather, to allow differing professional opinions not reaching the people with view to promote informed choices and not be dictated to by a group of individuals who sit in the National Civil Protection Headquarters, sowing fear and paralysis daily.

“The time we live in is the most difficult in the history of mankind,” said Suzana Pesa Vuckovic, adding that the media is an extended arm of politics. “We want media that do not censor.” “We will open all the windows they have closed, all the hearts that have fallen asleep.”

Roberto Mates, a father who camped in front of Pakrac Hospital, said that from Monday, parents will be able to be with their children at Pakrac Hospital 24 hours a day. “Don’t touch our children,” he said.

“I am glad to see a lot of different people, we are all here with one goal, to keep Croatia free. The job of the government is to protect our rights, not to spread fear and panic “, concludes Ivan Pokupec.

The elderly and infirm have been held captive for months, he points out. “Many people died because they did not have adequate medical care, not from the crown.”

“We are the employer, and this is a warning before they are fired.” “Today we are fighting for life and freedom,” he said.

Freedom Festival Zagreb Croatia
5 September 2020
dr Srecko Sladoljev
Photo: Screenshot

The arrival of the ambulance is a demonstration of power, said immunologist Srecko Sladoljev for the ambulance that came to the square at one point.

“This day is bigger than when the presidential elections took place. I always tell the truth and that’s why I’m censored. A few moments ago something happened. An ambulance came, I’ll tell you something about it.

This ambulance, which was parked right there with its sirens and trumpets turned on, is a demonstration of force and those who do not want our freedom.

When Mother Teresa was asked why she did not come to protest against the war, she said that she would have come had a festival of peace been organised. That is why this is a festival, not a protest because on the other side the energies are completely different,” said Sladoljev.

Certainly, the Ambulance vehicle could have passed through the peace-loving and well-behaved crowds silently, but it chose to turn its blasting noise up to the loudest! Indeed, a demonstration of power that also signals a threat.

Freedom Festival Zagreb Croatia
5 September 2020
Banner portraying main personalities
from National Civil Protection Headquarters:
We will vaccinate you all,
for your good and our benefit”
Photo: Screenshot

“We are all first and foremost human beings, and the life of a human being consists of emotions, contacts, family and everything that is human. It is important to stop for a while and feel how the space of humanity around us has narrowed and how the hoop is tightening on all levels “, said Velimir Ponos, a columnist for the Logično portal.

He added that a padlock has been placed on all levels of our being and it is a real lockdown.

“Another illusion is that there is an epidemic in Croatia. The decision on the epidemic was not published in the Official Gazette, if there is no such decision on the Official Gazette, then there is no epidemic ”.

There is no validity of evidence on the effectiveness of masks, he states. “We are treated like guinea pigs; an experiment is performed on us. We are nobody’s toys, we are nobody’s experiments. A dictatorship is being implemented. He can’t mask my face without my approval. That’s what the constitution says, that’s what the law says. The mask on my face can’t be forced.”

It is not acceptable to make measures and decisions, as he emphasises, on the basis of panic and propaganda. “One-sided and without re-examination.”

“As of Monday, our children are threatened by an unhealthy and unnatural environment in schools. There they will be exposed to dramatic experiences. You are depriving children of the basic social contact of closeness, ” he said.

Freedom Festival Zagreb Croatia
5 September 2020
Banner: “For Freedom of Childhood”
Photo: Screenshot

Anita Supe pointed out that everyone gathered here today with the same goal to say: “Enough is enough!”. “We have been feeling the pressure you have been feeling for months, we have heard that you have had enough because we have had enough. We have heard the world and Europe, we have seen Berlin, London, Dublin.”

She added that the measures have no health or human basis. “We have been denied the right to work, companies have been closed and thousands have lost their jobs. Parents are forbidden to stay with their children in hospitals for more than 15 minutes, the elderly are locked up like in a cage in homes … That is why we invite you to forget what separates us rather to remember what unites us. The right to freedom of choice and the right to freedom of opinion and speech. To the true information we have been denied. We will not give up our fundamental rights.”

Ina Vukic

 

Fragmented Body Politic – Symptom Of Lost Control Over Croatia’s Socio-Political Destiny

Photo: Alamy.com/ licensed/copyright (c)

Fragmentation of the so-called patriotic (domoljubne), usually dubbed as right-wing, body politic in Croatia has never been more vigorous than at the present time. All parties and political movements (and there are many) involved proclaim either in words or implications a vigorous critical loyalty to Croatia and, ultimately, to the values of the 1990’s Homeland War. However, regretfully, although all proclaim same or very similar political-social goals, burrows that separate them from each other appear insurmountable.

Fragmented body, say many an academics in the world, symbolises castration anxiety as well as loss of control; in this case over national direction. The emergence and seemingly flourishing on life-support from sections of the electorate of more than 150 political parties in Croatia vying for power, espousing a desperate need for change, may be construed as evidence that control has actually been lost in Croatia especially over the process of full democratisation as espoused in the values of the Homeland War.

In recent years, it has become obvious to all but the willfully blind that much is not well with the Croatian self-determination and ordered liberty to be had in a functional democracy where red tape and corruption are minimised (where detrimental practices inherited from the communist Yugoslavia era are thoroughly weeded out from society and public administration).

The signs that something is seriously wrong are myriad:

  • a degree of political polarisation unprecedented since the era when Croats won the bloody war of Serb aggression in 1990’s through which independence was won – through which Croatia seceded from communist Yugoslavia
  • a bitter and debilitating culture war between and within both the left-winged (mainly former communists) and right-winged (who pursue decommunisation and Croatian national identity in accordance with Homeland War values) political spectrum that appears to define and/or steer everyday life of even ordinary people;
  • the erosion of the bonds of civic amity and emergence of a civic culture animated by mutual hatred and contempt based on political ideology and directions in which Croatia should develop and assert its place in the democratic world;
  • a pervasive cynicism and a growing crisis of legitimacy of all or any party or movement body politic;
  • the seeming loss of any notion of an overarching common good to which private interests must be subordinated and resultant understanding of politics as a zero-sum game;
  • and what might be called “gridlock” wherein the fragmentation of the national body politic into a plethora of competing interests (more often personal than not) whose conflicting and ever-escalating demands induce something akin to political paralysis. (Most Croatians are acutely and keenly aware that the system is broken, that public institutions are not functioning the way they should in a democracy but seem unsure as to how to fix this.)

Indeed, Croatia (as do some Western countries) seems to be witnessing the rise of what several political scientists call “anomic democracy” in which democratic politics becomes more an arena for the assertion of conflicting interests than the building of common purposes. A common purpose for Croatia, as the values asserted via the 1990’s Homeland War tell us, is that of democratisation and decommunisation. The latter encapsulates the absolute need to rid the country of the totalitarian-like control in all aspects of state authority and expression whether it be in user-friendly legislation that promotes economic growth, an independent judiciary or balanced mainstream media etc.

In fact, so divided does Croatia appear and so dysfunctional has its politics become that it feels like being in the midst a “cold civil war”.  The vitriol that gushes out between people of differing political allegiances is often suffocating. Perhaps herein lies the reason why true national leaders, whom a significant portion of people trust, are practically non-existent or, at least, invisible, or not afforded a chance to shine in the environment of many egocentric or “I know best” players.

Croatia’s critical public consensus regarding secession from communist Yugoslavia was at its peak during 1990’s and the Croatian Democratic Union/HDZ led this field of goal-focused national harmony. Then came year 2000 and increased subversive political activities from former communists which resurrected Pro-communist Yugoslavia nostalgia in at least 30% of the Croatian national body politic. This, undoubtedly, led to the collapse of the overwhelmingly widespread consensus as to how Croatia should develop and a disastrous and shameful treatment of war veterans from the Homeland War. The results of such a collapse in consensus is a society that begins to disintegrate into collection of warring tribes. The most striking example of this occurs when a society explodes into bitterly opposed camps that, disagreeing fundamentally on the moral and political principles that should govern public life, are ultimately unable to coexist in peace. It is not rare to come across people in Croatia who believe that nothing bar “gunpowder” will save Croatia, i.e. bring it back to the point of “Croatia above all else” that was in the 1990’s! On a lighter or less dramatic note, as the public philosophy that united Croatian people in the 1990’s gradually disappears, the society splinters into a multitude of hostile groups – a multitude of political tribes, as it were, which far from viewing each other as partners in a common enterprise and exhibiting an attitude of trust or civility toward one another, will instead view each other with hostility, fear and resentment.

At the same time, insofar as decisions on public policy involve the use of means to achieve social goals, the loss of shared purposes make decision-making increasingly difficult, if not impossible. If we can’t agree about where we are trying to go, how are we ever going to agree about – or even rationally discuss – the best means to get there? In short, the groups into which the polity has fragmented will be increasingly unable to reach agreement about public policies, increasingly reluctant to make compromises, and increasingly unwilling to sacrifice their own interests for the good of the community as a whole. Thus, unified action on the part of the community will become increasingly difficult if not impossible and political paralysis increasingly possible. The machinery of democracy continues to operate, but effective governance becomes impossible. The end result is the loss by the state of its legitimacy, its moral authority.

Today in this year of General Elections due around September election platforms are already being formulated and it is not unusual to come across the slogan or rhetoric that goes something like this: ”We will return Croatia to the Croatian People”, “We will return the government to the people”, etc. These emerge from a number of political parties or movements, particularly those who have positioned themselves on the right-wing or conservative side of the political spectrum.

But, how can you have “government by the people,” without having a people?

Surely, the multitudes of political parties and movements – the many personalities vying for the top, result in the scattering of votes (people) that would form that critically needed consensus for the country. Today in Croatia, pluralism has grown to the point where, we’ve reached the stage where we are ceasing to agree even in basic respects on what man is and how he should live, where morally and intellectually we can scarcely be considered one people. This is particularly visible in the shambles and political trade-offs regarding the importance for Croatia’s sovereignty of the Homeland War. The ever-growing loudness of pro-former-communist regime via left-wing parties and political movements, aggravates the critical consensus for national direction to a painful level. Hence, the common body of cultural capital on which Croatia has historically traded is disappearing noticeably, and its political institutions have become increasingly dysfunctional in that they fail to adhere to common good and insert into the “national” the “personal” interests. As for what the future holds, insofar as the prospects for re-establishing some type of substantive consensus any time in the foreseeable future seem slim, it seems likely we’re looking at dysfunction as far as the eye can see. And, that is not, to put it gently, a happy prospect.

Our politically fragmented country, as reflected in the current heated political factions, created an embankment foreclosing the opportunity for the creation of real discourse. The impetus is on us, the citizen, to act as catapults and destroy that wall, and partake in holistic discourse with one another, to push for and stand behind a leader who has not lost sight of why Croatia fought for independence and has the skill and supporting “machinery” to avert the possible disaster of the loss of Croatian identity and will. This thought, or rather wish, leads me to the beginning of this article regarding the fragmentation of the patriotic body politic.

On Sunday March 15th the Croatian Democratic Union/HDZ (current major political party holding a coalition government) is holding Party elections, characterised by the split of the party into two evidently viciously warring camps. Current President Andre Plenkovic and his team on one side and Miro Kovac and his team on the other – each asserting that they are the right people to reinvigorate this fragmented party into what it once was – a party to be looked up to by a large proportion of the nation’s population. The implications of this rest on the realisation that even the Croatia’s major political party, that ushered in Croatian independence and secession from communism, has lost the critical consensus regarding where Croatia should go or should be; one faction claiming to be “more Croatian” than the other.  Furthermore, also on the right-wing of politics, there are a number of political parties and movements and independent politicians vying for a similar outcome if elected into government at this year’s General Elections. The leading groups opposing HDZ’s control of the right-winged or patriotic electorate are the Croatian Sovereignists (led by Hrvoje Zekanovic and made up of a number of smaller political parties and individual activists) and their current coalition partners in the Parliamet (Block for Croatia/Zlatko Hasanbegovic and independent MP Zeljko Glasnovic) as well as the newly founded Domoljubni Pokret (Patriotic Movement) headed by Mirislav Skoro.

There does not seem to be much movement on either the left or the right side of the political spectrum to reel into their fold voters from the opposing ideological camps. This of course suggests that nationally, ideological divisions still prevail and, hence, attachments to individual politicians rather than party programs (for all the people regardless of their political ideology). Political ideology defined life during the communist Yugoslavia era and it seems it will take some serious work in order to free the people of this burden, and encourage them to look beyond political personalities when voting. Otherwise, fragmentation of body politic will continue to flourish even though the race to secure a cushy position for the individual politician and not for true representation of voter or constituency needs is obvious, and in essence disliked by the very constituency.

As socio-political actors, it is time when people and politicians need to realise that they are not on a crusade when it comes to Croatia as a legitimate State; rather, that they are, at this time of severe fragmentation of body politic,  on an exploratory expedition to bring Croatia to how it was imagined and fought for during the Homeland War. Croatia is independent, sovereign and as such has the capacity and validity to make its own decisions for national welfare.

While the end-goal of electoral politics is winning, it should also be more about the advancement of certain programmes and policies. In a democracy it is the latter that brings in votes. And when faced with the reality of electoral or body politic fragmentation arrived at through personal ambitions of individual politicians, unless critical consensus is reached between them, leading to programme-framed and managed coalition – victory is poor, if at all existent. An interesting six-month period for Croatia and its progress into full democratisation and national identity – coming to your door! Play your part for Croatia! Ina Vukic

 

Croatia: Jazovka Pit – The Grit For Positive Change

Jazovka Pit Croatia
Mass grave of victims of communist crimes

 

Modern, independent, democracy desirous Croatia was created in the early 1990’s on the determination to secede from communist (?antifascist) Yugoslavia and the Croatian Homeland War secured its success. This is particularly a pertinent issue and fact to keep in mind and uphold strongly, especially because Croatia’s antifascists in their overwhelming majority did not want an independent Croatia, did not enlist to defend it against the Serbian and Yugoslav Army aggression and yet today and ever since the Homeland War ended in 1990’s they seized much of the power within the country, wrongfully pinning credit for Croatia’s independence to their own political agenda rather than those who did fight. The Homeland War and its veterans are consistently denied the rightful credit, political and social status. The significance of the Homeland War for today’s Croatia is consistently undermined and undervalued by those in power,especially since year 2000 when former Communist League and their political camp began coming to power.

The result is a bitterly divided, confused and disappointed nation that has lost the heart of the goal of freedom and democracy for which it paid in rivers of blood and devastation. The values fought for in Homeland War are usurped and pocketed by former communists (who generally rallied against Croatian independence from Yugoslavia), symbols of communist Yugoslavia celebrated on a large scale while those who fought for and wanted an independent Croatia are branded as fascists or ultra-right, visibly often vilified and socially degraded. Controlled mainstream media played a leading role in the latter and widely continues to do so in perverse disregard for victims of communist crimes.

Instead of finishing off the job it started, full democracy fully (optimally) separated from communist heritage, Croatia had after the Homeland War ended in late 1990’s stepped from conflict (with Yugoslav, Serb and Montenegrin forces) to co-existence between staunch communists/Yugoslavia nostalgics and anti-communists/pro-democracy and independence Croats, and after almost thirty years it is nowhere near the third stage or phase of development – reconciliation.

It is generally held worldwide that reconciliation is impossible until the truth is known. It is important for people to know what really happened and that truth be acknowledged and accepted on a national level. Croatia is very far from achieving that human, social and political standard that would open the doors and windows to a better future, the future it fought for during the Homeland War. While communist crimes are widely treated with justification instead of abhor, while Croatians keep wrongfully equating communism with antifascism, ignoring its depraved criminal past, pretending to have fought for Croatian people’s liberty or freedom during WWII when in fact it fought to keep them enslaved within Yugoslavia, spreading terror and purges of innocent people, especially against those who fought or wanted real Croatian freedom and liberty through NDH, there will be no reconciliation; the truth remains imprisoned even if it is visible to every eye.

Jazovka is a pit in the Zumberak area (some 90 km from Zagreb) where bodies of hundreds of fighters for an independent state of Croatia captured by the Partisans (communists fighting to retain Yugoslavia and Croatia within it) were dumped from January 1943 and, after WWII ended in 1945, hundreds dead (as well as many still alive) prisoners of war, medical staff, nuns, civilians were also dumped there. The pilgrimage to Jazovka occurs every year on 22 June and the dark hole in the ground, the pit’s opening with humble memorial stones, tell a horrific story. Not only the story of Jazovka but the story of horrendous communist crimes committed against Croatians who were the enemies of the communist regime.

General Zeljko Glasnovic, MP for Croatian Diaspora (L)
Dr Zlatko Hasanbegovic,MP, Independents for Croatia (R)
Laying wreath at Jazovka Pit 22 June 2019

June 22 also marks the date from 1941 when, communists say the first communist Partizan unit was formed. Due to lack of historical documentary evidence this has been disputed by several notable historians in Croatia. Whether it was formed then or not it and all Yugoslav Partisan units were communist despite the former communists’ and their sympathisers persistence in calling themselves antifascists. The truth is that Yugoslav communists were a far cry from antifascist movement of the then Europe. It is also the date when the so-called antifascists of Croatia gather at Brezovica forest, closer to Zagreb than what Zumberak is, to celebrate the formation of the first Partizan unit in 1941.

Despite declaring the federal nature of Yugoslavia’s organisation, the principles of republican statehood and national rights, the truth is that the communist powers systematically denied Croatian state individuality, persecuted and imprisoned hundreds of thousands of communist opponents, assassinated scores and murdered hundreds of thousands of Croatians after WWII (some 1000 mass graves with communist crimes victims lay scattered throughout Croatia alone, not to mention those throughout Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina) … all this led the bloody breaking away from Yugoslavia in 1990’s. Brezovica forest symbolises and represents all this and is celebrated as victory for people’s liberation! All this, they, the antifascists, pin onto the “glory” of liberating Europe in WWII! How deranged a political streak can get is demonstrated by this appalling and twisted perseverance.

Croatia’s Prime Minister Andrej Plenković Friday 21 June 2019 sent a congratulatory message on the occasion of the Anti-Fascist Struggle Day stating:

“Remembering the 22nd of June we remember the day when in 1941, in Croatia, in the Brezovica forest near Sisak, the first anti-fascist unit was founded in the occupied Europe at the time.

Contribution to the victory over Nazism and fascism in World War II, which was a prerequisite for the building of today’s democratic and united Europe, had been given by numerous Croatian anti-fascists, of whom we are reminded today.

With the establishment of independent, free and democratic Croatia, victory in the Homeland War and full membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation and the European Union, we have become an equal participant in building a common European future as well as preserving the universal values of peace, freedom and human rights.

On behalf of the Croatian Government and personally, all Croatian citizens, I congratulate the Anti-Fascist Fight Day.”

President Kolinda Grabar Kitarovic’s message came in the same tone as Prime Minister Plenkovic’s! 

What good is the President’s reported patronage of the Zumberak memorial event on June 22 when she fails miserably to mention in her address to the nation on this day the innocent victims of communist Partisans buried in the Zumberak Jazovka Pit! This is utterly devastating for anyone looking the truth in the face.

Jazovka Pit mass grave, Croatia

The universal values of peace, freedom and human rights were not the values afforded to Croatians by the communists and therefore, I, for one, reject the blanket congratulations expressed by Plenkovic and Grabar-Kitarovic to all Croatians. They are only too aware that Zumberak gathering is occurring at the same time as the Brezovica forest one and have the duty as Prime Minister and President to acknowledge that fact and not ignore it. They are, after all, the Prime Minister and President for the country that is suffering enormously because of the persistent justification and relative ignoration of communist crimes and denial of human rights to Croats who truly fought for Croatia’s independence.

Jazovka Pit and what it represents is the grit for change Croatia needs to embrace so desperately. The word grit in psychological terms represents the passion and the perseverance for meaningful goals and the most important goal in anyones life is to know the truth. For Croatia this goal is particularly critical and the perseverance with events such as the one at Jazovka Pit on 22 June, tell that true grit is alive and on course. Without such events, truth has no chance, reconciliation has no chance, justice for all victims has no chance. Ina Vukic

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