Comment: Croatia as an EU Member

John Pindar: “Croatia is going to be a small fish in a very big pond. That does not mean that the country will be ignored. Small countries can achieve great things in the EU and punch above their weight. Take Estonia, for example, which has half the population of Croatia”.

Croatia Business Report

by John Pindar

Five years ago I wrote about Croatia for CBR, with an enthusiastic endorsement of Croatia being in the European Union. It’s been interesting to read the article again, to see if I disgree with it.

To begin, I explained my connection with Croatia, described my reactions visiting the country (17 times) and provided examples of its strengths. I wrote: ‘every time I travel round Croatia, I see much that is positive.’ I still believe that- and I’ve been to Vukovar since I wrote those words. They apply there too.

Naturally enough, I had to discuss the reasons why my hopes for Croatia being in the EU had not come to fruition. That meant addressing the issue of the Hague war crimes tribunal. Clearly, the release of General Gotovina has provided a boost to Croatia’s self-belief and morale and a big issue dogging Croatia’s membership hopes has been cast aside.

When it came to discussing Croatian politics…

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Comments

  1. Računovodstvo says:

    I just returned from Croatia approximately a month ago. I absolutely loved my time there visiting family and the sites, but I will say that Croatia does have a long way to go. Foreign investment is desperately needed, not just to provide much needed jobs for the economy but to also inject competition to improve the companies which are currently operating in Croatia.

    One thing of interest I did notice is that my relatives, many of whom are educated did not understand accounting as a separate and unique profession from economics, which everyone assumed I was. Accounting is essential to economic development. According to the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants, “high-quality corporate reporting is key to improving transparency, facilitating the mobilization of domestic and international investment, creating a sound investment environment and fostering investor confidence, thus promoting financial stability”. And after discovering that no university in Croatia offers a degree program in accounting, then I wasn’t surprised when my cousin told me that “no one likes that [accounting] because things never balance out”.

    I hope the universities add accounting to their curriculum. It would create another industry, instead of having the workforce inundated with economists. Besides, it would be nice to know what my family did.

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    • A very interesting and revealing discovery Racunovodstvo – hopefully accounting and independent audits will catch on there in Croatia as they should

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    • Well you have all mentioned, only here in Croatia states namely government has deliberately created the conditions for foreign investment (introduced by large state tax 25%, and a host of other taxes, many licenses should only start a business (bureaucracy is a major problem) and a number of second illogical). Wherever large tax investors have no interest investing.People who can only succeed are people who personally know people in positions in politics but in return you have to bribe people. Plenty of things here the wrong set (intentionally set). Suppose the economy ministry does not leading man businessman who knows his job, but politically appointed man who is obedient to premier (control of one man in all as the party system-communism). We can not price the knowledge and ability to work but who is watching the party of former Communists and they make decisions about everything and do not waste time with knowledge and educated people.Many years need to pass for Croatia to solve the former party system, it is our wound that will be difficult to solve, because it is deeply rooted in our country.

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  2. Računovodstvo says:

    Besides, it would be nice if my family knew what I did for a living.

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  3. This is very interesting and informative for a person outside Croatia. Thank you.

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    • Glad you liked it gpcox 🙂 Cheers

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    • The current Chairman Repulike Croatian Ivo Josipovic, the son of the man who was the commander of Goli Otok (Prison for Political and do not like-minded Tito’s dictatorial totalitarianism). Therefore Chairman does not want to condemn totalitarian and dictatorial regime, he and like him kind of system they want to hide behind cleverly called antifašizam.Rarely mentioned crimes committed by partisans II. World War and especially after the war in peace, many murders and crimes committed by the partisans and Communism led by Titom.U Croatia is a democracy but only a dead letter, with us not implemented lustration and therefore in our government not the full rule of law, freedom and no condemnation of communism as a totalitarian system (single-mindedness). in Croatia celebrates COMMUNISM and erected monuments in places where innocent people were killed by partisans and appear as their victims fell for the fight that gave rise to Communism as that.Simbol five-pointed star is a totalitarian and a crime under this symbol has been made not only in war but also in peace, in Croatia and around the world where he ruled, red five-pointed stars killed millions of people in peace (Stalin in Russia, Tito in the former Yugoslavian and others). Would need more evidence that this system is condemned as wrong and put in history as a negative.

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      • Thank you Drago – if we continue our resolve to have communist crimes prosecuted and condemned then, regardless of die-hard communists’ resistance, truth and justice will prevail for its victims.

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  4. prayingforoneday says:

    Please accept this The Sunshine Award
    http://prayingforoneday.wordpress.com/2013/08/27/the-sunshine-award/
    If you don’t do Awards PLEASE pass it onto a friend who does.
    I hope you can accept.
    Thank you Shaun

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  5. Great reporting. Ann

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  6. Thanks for Sharing..

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  7. Računovodstvo says:

    I’m always happy to see Croatia get mentioned in large, prominent newspapers; however, I’m not so sure this is the best reason, but — hey, whatever works to bring attention to that jewel of a country!

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/10283527/If-Indian-men-have-the-least-sex-who-has-the-most.html

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