Australian Croatian Voters Have Lustrated From Their Lives Croatian Communists and Former Communists!

Candidates for Croatian General Elections
4th and 5th July 2020 on “Independent List Zeljko Glasnovic
From left front row! Marko Juric, Zeljko Glasnovic, Ina Vukic, Mate Knezovic Back row from left: Milena Matic, Tomislav Sunic, Marina Sunić-Zakman, Elizabeta Mađarevi, Srecko Telar Candidates not on photo: Marko Perkovic, Martina Ćurić, Franjo Miroslav Perkovic,
Marina Sabljic, Kresimir Tabak,

 

Only about 18 months ago I wrote that lustration in Croatia starts in Australia. Yesterday’s General Elections for Croatian Parliament results have proved that is the case.

Knowing in advance that candidates running for Croatian Parliament from the diaspora have no chance of getting in due to discrimination built into the Electoral law I am pleased to say that an overwhelming victory by our Independent list Zeljko Glasnovic in every polling booth in Australia where I live was achieved, with the highest percentage of votes being in Sydney (states of NSW and Queensland) 77% and Melbourne (States of Victoria and South Australia) 63% Canberra 51%…

The sadly realistic point about running as a candidate at elections for the Croatian Parliament from the Croatian diaspora has never been about possibility of winning because winning, due to brutal discrimination within the Electoral legislation, which makes winning a parliamentary seat an impossible outcome! The point about running as a candidate at elections for the Croatian Parliament from the Croatian diaspora is about fighting for justice and fighting against discrimination and collecting evidence of that abominable discrimination against people (the Diaspora) who were crucial in the fight for independence from communist Yugoslavia. Croatian HDZ and SDP governments since year 2000 have ensured that they place the Croatian diaspora within the same Electorate (XI) as Bosnia and Herzegovina and that they reduce the number of seats from 12 to 3! Furthermore, more than 90% of Croatian eligible voters in the diaspora physically cannot reach a polling booth due to distance and prohibitive personal costs for travel to the booth. Bosnia and Herzegovina has thousands upon thousands more voters who are able to access polling places on election day than the Diaspora. In the Diaspora in 2010 the Croatian government has done away with accessible voting booths that used to exist within Croatian clubs etc in the diaspora and limited the polling booths to Croatian Consulates and Embassies!

Talk about passive aggression against own people! This is a painful example!

This is purposeful discrimination against citizens by a government and it cannot be ignored nor unattended. This is a purposeful action of former communists and their followers who want corruption, nepotism and citizen-unfriendly laws to continue, to thrive just as they did in former communist Yugoslavia. I have felt it on my own back as a candidate from Australia but Australian Croats have done me proud, have done retired General Zeljko Glasnovic proud. Overwhelming majority of voters in Australia – true fighters for democracy and freedom and lasting well-being of all Croats. Even if official Croatia has failed miserably at lustration, the General Elections’ results in Australia (and I am quite confident it will be the same for rest of the Croatian diaspora, e.g. USA, Canada, South America…) overwhelmingly demonstrate that they themselves have managed to implement lustration in their local communities. They have managed to decimate HDZ/Croatian Democratic Union and SDP/Social Democratic Party to smithereens!

This should be a glorious wake-up call for democracy-loving Croatians of today whose voices have been silenced by discrimination and lies!

My personal gratitude to all Croatians in Australia who have been able to reach a polling booth and who voted, in droves, voted for the Independent list Zeljko Glasnovic on which list I myself stood as a candidate! The fight for truth and justice continues! Ina Vukic

2020 Croatian Statehood Day: The Only Way Forward is Decommunise And Democratise!

Franjo Tudjman with Croatian people – independence at the doorstep – 1990

“Communism is dead, but nobody has yet seen its corpse,” pronounced the first post-Soviet president of Estonia, Lennart Meri in the early 1990s (Meri 1994). For Croatia, it has taken inordinately and widely insufferably longer compared to its Central and East European counterparts to bury the body of communism. A reason behind this is undoubtedly entailed in what General Zeljko Glasnovic, who was until 18 May 2020 (when the parliament was dissolved pending new General Elections due on 5 July 2020) an Independent Member of the Croatian Parliament for Croats living in Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as in the Diaspora reiterated recently:

“… in Croatian heads the Berlin Wall has not yet fallen, we have Croatia, without Croatian content…!”

General Zeljko Glasnovic
Photo: Cropix

The plight for thorough and ultimate decommunisation in Croatia has become urgently valid. The past two decades of HDZ/SDP governments saw an aggressively increasing surge or resurfacing of celebrating symbols pertaining to former communist Yugoslavia. This has become an excruciatingly painful component to multitudes of Croats throughout the world as such tell-signs devalue and push into the national backburner the reality that between 1991 and 1995 an overwhelming mass of Croats fought a bloody war to achieve independence from communist Yugoslavia. The governments during this period, and indeed since Franjo Tudjman’s death in late 1999, were led by people loyal to the Communist Party of Yugoslavia regardless of whether they were its high operatives or children of those who were; resistant to change which would reveal the ugly face of corruption and theft many are often associated with.

As the Homeland War ended in 1998 (militarily in 1995 and in 1998 as part of peaceful reintegration of the remainder of Croatia’s occupied territory) there were no post-Homeland War reforms in the field of policy of memory; there were no “decommunisation” laws passed nor suggested after Franjo Tudjman’s death, which would have been the only and natural step into democracy! Judging from his speech at the inauguration of Croatia’s Parliament in 1990, had Franjo Tudjman lived after the War had ended long enough, these laws would be a reality today.

There is no doubt about that! Were Croatia’s leaders in government or at the helm of its Presidential Office not either overtly or covertly resistant to change specific Decommunisation laws would be a reality, not still a desired necessity to pursue, today!

Given that Croatia seceded from communist Yugoslavia after 94% of its voters in April/May 1991 and the bloody war of aggression ensued, one of those decommunisation laws would have been within the realm of condemnation of the communist regime and prohibition of its propaganda symbols such as the red star, such as the portrait of Josip Broz Tito, celebrating WWII Patrisan victories that ensured Croatia a continued place within the disastrous totalitarian regime of Yugoslavia, etc. Other Decommunisation laws would have been in the realm of lustration, which includes the cleansing of the public office of former communist operatives as well as cleaning the public space of Yugoslav-era legacy (e.g. renaming of streets, city squares, parks, buildings …). During the times of Franjo Tudjman’s presidency the communist names of thousands streets, squares … were changed but this was not as part of a distinctly stated decommunisation law; this was a sign of the direction Tudjman intended to take Croatia in (after the War of Independence had ended) but after his death this process was purposefully delayed and even actively thwarted and discouraged as former communists came to power.

Even as hundreds upon hundreds of mass graves with the remains of the hundreds upon hundreds of thousands of victims of communist crimes were being discovered, and still are being discovered in Croatia, resistance for decommunisation became stronger and stronger. Those politicians and ordinary people who saw decommunisation as an absolutely essential process that would open the way to the process of full democratisation suddenly were labelled as fascists or Ustashas by politicians and various “dignitaries” in Croatia whose personal curriculum vitaes are saturated with connections to the Communist Party of Yugoslavia.

In a broader perspective decommunisation is defined or seen as the process of rejection of the Communist legacy through the restructuring of the state system (including independent judiciary, checks and balances to ward off or prevent corruption…), and through changing mentality, behaviour and value systems in individual and collective dimensions. A deeper decommunisation consists in its widening of the next field: personal (lustration), educational (uncompromising and critical historical policy of the state regarding the Communist era) and the symbolic (the elimination of figures and events associated with Communism as patrons of localities, streets, squares, institutions and public places).

This year Croatia celebrates, on 30th May, 30 years since the constitution of its first multi-party Croatian Parliament and the beginning of transfer of power from Yugoslav communist regime to the independent Croatia although secession from Yugoslavia was voted in by the Croatian people at the 19 May 1991 referendum.  Unlike in other former communist countries in Central and Eastern Europe the transfer of power was not peaceful and, indeed, it was thwarted by a bloody war; the transfer of power, the transfer from the communist mental chains continues to experience blockages with ugly reality largely brought on by the judicial system that has not even attempted independence from former communist operatives and associates.

Serious problems remain in Croatia as former communists and their allies render this problem almost invisible to the naked eye by devising and playing a tit-for-tat WWII Pratizans vs Ustashas political game. The reality is that the state does not function as expected by its citizens, basic institutions of administration of justice do not work as they should, the level of corruption is too high and politics while passionate operates rather as a façade, with a great deal of real activity happening behind the scenes and elsewhere. Citizens do not believe in their impact on the political processes (and they should) and plenty of them complain that the institutions of the administration of justice do not act properly – far from it.

Why did Croatia come to this?

While one would not see the reason for this through the controlled and largely biased mainstream media, which gives nor offers due regard to the politicians who constantly beat the drum of decommunisation and democratisation, a substantial number of Croatian citizens living in Croatia and abroad, as well as observers of the affairs of the country, claim that remnants of the communist past, unsatisfactory dealing with legacies from the former regime, are responsible for the contemporary dire state of affairs. Mainstream media has a great deal to answer for in this because it simply does not offer the Croatian public the variety of opinions and pursuits of politicians that people (voters) of every democracy have an absolute right to as part of democracy. It is blatantly clear that the problem of the relations between legality, the rule of law, institution building and dealing with the past in the process of transition from communism is enormous. This problem has grown roots in the failing economy and the declining standard of living despite the fact that Croatia is a member state of the European Union. The intricacies and modes of corruption that defined the former communist Yugoslavia society are deeply interwoven and rooted into the Croatian state system to this day. Safety for orderly basic livelihood with its compulsory existential markers known in developed democracies is nowhere to be seen in Croatia for the ordinary citizen: Courts are not independent, Court cases last years and years, many ten to fifteen years, wages and pensions can mainly be described as alarmingly inadequate even for basic needs for living, red tape for business enterprises is suffocating, unchecked nepotism is flourishing, corruption widespread, electoral system flawed to the point that a voter simply cannot be assured that his/her vote will go the way he/she intended …

I am quite certain that Croatians living in the diaspora or abroad see all this and suffer because of it largely because the leading politicians in the past 20 year have made them redundant for the direction Croatia is taking. Redundant they are not – they helped create the independent Croatia.

Asserting their rights to help shape Croatia into a full democracy has become a non-negotiable element in loving the Croatian homeland for Croats living abroad.

We are entering the 2020 Croatian general elections campaigns period in Croatia and abroad. A time for change is as strong today as it was in 1990. The change, decommunisation with democratisation cannot be brought about by those political parties who in the past 20 years have failed so miserably the plight of the Croatian people for full democracy; for a decent life without fear of corruption. For this I would like to remind all of the speech Franjo Tudjman made on 30 May 1990:

“… The problems facing the new government are many, complex and tangled, from local communities and municipal councils, to the Parliament, the Government and the Presidency. Within a short period, they will parallelly need to solve many problems of life’s importance which other European and Western countries solved half a century ago, or even half a millennium ago. Let’s mention only the important ones: proprietary relationships and economic life; constitutional order of pluralistic civil society with the appropriate government system modelled on countries of the free world; modernisation and revalorisation of public services, especially science and culture, teaching and education, health and social welfare, administrative services and public activities (information, journalism, Radio and TV), etc.

Numerous very complex problems have accumulated in all of these areas, and without solving them in their reciprocity there can be no exit from the crisis, or real progress…”

It is the 30th of May 2020 and these problems that needed to be solved in their reciprocity (the problems entrenched in the communist Yugoslavia regime) have not been solved. At the coming elections the more Croatian citizens both in Croatia and abroad arm themselves to vote, the better are the prospects for finally removing those problems.

Vote for change! Vote for Croatia!

Vote against those who have proven incapable of holding government that would put Croatia and Homeland War values above all else! That is the duty we all hold for a full democracy and, hence, an orderly and decent living in Croatia for all. Ina Vukic

 

 

 

 

THE PSYCHOTIC LEFT – THE GREATEST THREAT TO CROATIA

 

ret. general Zeljko Glasnovic, MP/Croatian Parliament
Photo: Screenshot Croatian Parliament January. 24, 2020

Speech by retired general Zeljko Glasnovic, Member of Croatian Parliament, Zagreb, on January 21-22, 2020 (Translated into English by Tom Sunic, translation edited by Ina Vukic):

It’s now one month after the Presidential elections in Croatia and still we come across endless discussions being held about the election results. However, all these political palavers ignore the obvious. Not a single word is being uttered on the psychological factor that hinders Croatia from becoming a modern state. It is common knowledge that the clientelistic network of the geriatric Yugo-communists and their progeny is well embedded in all pores of our society. The legacy of the failed experiment, called SFRY (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia), is clearly visible today. The mindset which had generated nepotism, corruption, culture of sloth, the folklore of ‘one hand washes the other’, along with vestiges of socialist bureaucracy, coupled with the cumbersome and sluggish state apparatus, continues to shape the life of our citizens. Under the guise of liberal globalism and progress, Croatia’s political chameleons are still promoting the idea of proletarian internationalism. Former Czech politician and sociologist Tomas Masaryk remarked long ago: ‘The Bolsheviks know how to kill and rob, but they don’t know how to work’. That’s the way it is today. For example, since 1995, in order to cover shipyards’ losses various state agencies have ripped € 5,000 from each Croatian family of four.

We must distinguish and we must not forget, that former ‘Tito-Jugend’ (Tito-Youth) relay-baton carriers were not raised in the spirit of Scandinavian-type socialism, but learned their trade in the deadliest and most immoral ideology in the history of mankind. Mental Yugoslavs, such as MPs Stazic, Grbin, Pupovac and many others siting in here now, are not able to square away abstract ideas of the world revolution with the terrible human tragedy caused by communist regimes. One can’t grasp it unless one defines Communism as a form of psychopathology. The Old Left and its Marxist shrinks, both here and in the West, have managed to brainwash numerous generations through perfidious use of techniques, such as ‘group therapy’ and self-criticism. The alpha and omega of this evil, Chairman Mao Ce Tung, used these brainwashing techniques as a weapon against his own people. He is reported to have said: ‘This is the only way to prevent the contamination of our comrades’ minds and the body of our party from political dust and germs’. His precepts are now being copied in North Korea. An ex-cult leader, the so-called Reverend Jim Jones, used the same psychological deception in 1978 when he allegedly prompted 900 members of his sect (the so-called church of his) into committing collective suicide.

The New Left Antifa ventriloquists today use the same techniques as their predecessors did. Subverting parental authority remains one of their founding principles. The so-called ‘kinder-laden’ movement that emerged in Germany after World War II was the offshoot of the Frankfurt School doctrine on novel social engineering. Its goal was to over-sexualise children in kindergarten and to ‘liberate’ them from their parents. The Left still rationalises pedophilia in the guise of much vaunted ‘sexual rights for all’. Daniel Cohn – Bendit (nicknamed the Red Danny) – a former Member of the European Parliament – has been at the forefront of advocating for ‘sexual liberation’ of children. Pedophilia has a long history in Antifa circles. The nation-killer Stalin and his apprentice Tito abused 13 years old girls. Children in communist systems were taught to rat out on their parents’ and friends’ politically incorrect behaviour. If in the former communist East Germany 2% of the population collaborated with the communist secret police, the infamous STASI, one must also raise the question how many snitches did Socialist Republic of Croatia harbour in ex-communist Yugoslavia? Many of those individuals still hold key positions in public life today. This is the reason why Croatia’s state archives were selectively cleaned off before being handed over to Croatian academic institutions. It is often forgotten that in May 1990 the entire KPH (Communist Party of Croatia) archives on microfilm were handed over by its namesake, the quickly re-baptised Croatia’s SDP (Social Democratic Party) to the Yugoslav Communist headquarters in Belgrade, Serbia. As of today, the entire personnel apparatus of the largest criminal organisation in the history of southeastern Europe remains immune to domestic and international scrutiny.

Therefore, the greatest threat to the survival of Croatia as a nation-state is not of external but internal nature. The remnants of the revolutionary mob rule are still present in all spheres of the Croatian society. Social lowlifes, self-righteous narcissists, neurotics and sociopaths have always been at the forefront of violent revolutions. This mindset, which first came into being during the French Revolution in 1789, threatens not only Europe but the entire Western civilisation. No discussion, no dialogue with the carriers of criminal communist chromosomes is possible or feasible. These creatures have deceived themselves and remain immune to the truth. In his book Homo Sovieticus, the late Russian author Aleksandr Zinovyev labels a man who grew up in the USSR ‘an honest liar’; true, he goes to church even though he doesn’t believe in God – just in case God exists.

Someone stated recently: ‘Folks, our DNA was programmed to seek the truth and justice. Without those we can never be at peace with ourselves and with others. The past is the past, but the past must be reconciled with the truth in order for justice and lasting peace to be achieved’. Thank you for attention.”

—–

One does not necessarily need to be a qualified Psychologist or Psychiatrist in order to conclude that all Totalitarian regimes implemented to extremes (such as communist regime in former Yugoslavia, in the Soviet Union [Russia], in Cuba…) represent and, in actions, both political and government institutions’ operations, demonstrate a stark form of unconscious psychopathology acted out by the “leaders” as well as by their followers. Their actions tell us that these are people who had/have identified with this form of political system and they pass their mindset onto their families, their children and anyone they can influence in the society they live in (and beyond) regardless of time and culture. There are uncanny similarities in the underlying psychopathological mindset for control over people between Totalitarian and Tyrannical regimes. In both, the main aim of the system is the need to put into practice, at any cost, the personal, delusional omnipotence, and megalomaniac fantasies of the leader.

In communist Yugoslavia the communist political penchant spilled into the society and its culture with the aim of creating social change and, indeed, a new nationality – a Yugoslav nationality! The utopian naïveté present in Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto drove that ultimate goal of drowning/obliterating all the distinct nationalities that made up the Federation of Yugoslavia into a new nationality whose backbone would be defined by the degree of unquestioning loyalty to the communist leader. The leader, Josip Broz Tito, who, due to his deranged communist purges, rates among the top ten world’s mass murderers of the 20th century.  Indeed, and to the point of this post, the politics of communism in former Yugoslavia (including Croatia) went about its business of crafting a whole new society, with a dominant culture that would celebrate and identify with communist achievements. New anthropological views describe cultural influences on personality and psychopathology by focusing on the effect of social change in local contexts on sociopsychological processes.

At the time Croatia formally seceded from communist Yugoslavia in 1991 and by the time Croatians defended themselves and Croatia from the bloody Serbian/Yugoslav Army aggression, five decades of the criminal communist Totalitarian rule that preceded had meant that this underlying psychopathology was pervasive and entrenched in much of the Croatian society. Failure to expunge, to lustrate, this psychopathology from the Croatian society, which was adamant to develop into a democratic one, means that Croatia and its political leadership in power, its other powerful political parties such as Social Democratic Party, still nurture that communist psychopathology in many forms of aberrant democratic reality. Public administration and legislation adopted or passed in Croatia are still a far cry from what they should be in a democratic society. Deep-rooted corruption and nepotism, whose beginning and thriving date back to the communist Yugoslavia Totalitarian regime are just some examples of such aberrance. Ina Vukic

 

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