The Protocols of the Elders of Meron: Judge Frederik Harhoff points to Jewish intrigue at the ICTY

Greater Surbiton

Meron2

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has had a bumpy journey since its foundation in 1993. It has long been condemned by Serb and to a lesser extent Croat nationalists, as well as by left-wing and right-wing hardliners in the West, as a political court set up to serve the interests of the Great Powers. But until recently, it has been supported by liberals in the former Yugoslavia and in the West and beyond, as a positive and necessary exercise in international justice – albeit one that has not produced very satisfactory results. In recent months, however, a realignment has taken place: former supporters of the ICTY have begun to condemn it in the same ‘anti-imperialist’ terms used by the nationalists, and to present its judgements as the work of Great Power intrigue. Their anger has focused above all on the figure of Judge Theodor Meron

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Comments

  1. Like

  2. Good re-blog.

    Like

  3. Unfortunate title, given that the story seems reasonable and doesn’t seem anti-Semitic. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion is a manuscript known to be contrived by non-Jewish folks intent on stirring up trouble. Indeed, I’m an anti-Zionist. I’m also not Jewish.

    I think what this rabbi says is a good idea for all religions. The US, the country I live in isn’t supposed to have a state religion–even if people are trying to change that. I’m happy with the way it is. (There are enough wars already.)

    Like

    • Thank you on your comment Donald Miller. While the article’s title may seem unfortunate but given ICTY judge Frederik Harhoff “letter” of seemingly wild accusations against judge Theodor Meron and suggesting a Jewish driven pressure in realm of ICTY judgments one cannot but also see the “religious” twist Harhoff is forcing into it – without any evidence one might add. So, I guess: perhaps an unfortunate title to an unfortunate event with “read between the lines” invisible footnote. The article by Marko Attila Hoare is good indeed.

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      • Nice chatting with you. I was actually trying to think up something to say, because I know so little about Croatia. Most Americans don’t know much about what’s going on outside the US. I’m a bit more involved than that, but not to a high degree, like people who follow world events all the time.

        I like your blog site. 🙂

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      • Thanks Donald Miller – I’m based in Australia but of Croatian descent and my blog emerged from expressed need of relative lack of articles in the English language on issues affecting Croatia and its people. I appreciate your effort to place a comment and your comment before was most relevant and thought provoking. We live in a “global village” (to use a well worn cliche) so we slowly get to know one another through various means 🙂

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